Does Reproductive Tourism Treat Women Like Cattle?

Share

by Raywat Deonandan

This article first appeared in The Huffington Post Canada on Oct 29, 2012.

There’s a photo I often show my audience before starting my lectures on “reproductive tourism.” It’s from a marketing brochure of a fertility clinic in India, and features its medical director standing regally amongst a group of seated women, each with her face strategically concealed. These women are commercial surrogate mothers, whose wombs are for rent to wealthy Indians and foreigners alike. The word “stable” is sometimes uncomfortably used to describe such women, but effectively projects the problem many ethicists have with the practice, which some say reduces female fertility to something resembling an agricultural commodity. Continue reading

Share

Breast Cancer – The Hidden Epidemic

Share

By Ophira Ginsburg and Raywat Deonandan

This article was first published in India Currents Magazine on Oct 8, 2012.

When I told my husband I had breast cancer, he said, ‘I don’t want anything to do with you.  You can go die.’”  These are the words of a 45 year old divorced and homeless woman in Bangladesh. When we think of breast cancer, our image is usually of women seeking treatment in American hospitals, or of loved ones participating in those many fundraising runs that have popped up around the country.  It’s rarely of the already destitute and downtrodden women of the developing world being further denigrated or cast aside.  Yet it is in the slums and villages of the world’s poorest places where scientists are only now realizing that breast cancer is a hidden epidemic. Continue reading

Share

Kony 2012 campaign makes us feel good — and that’s bad

Share

kony

Kony 2012 campaign makes us feel good — and that’s bad

by Raywat Deonandan
March 13, 2012

This article was originally published in The Toronto Star.

 

As a specialist in global health and development, I’ve been watching the Stop Kony/Kony 2012 phenomenon closely, trying to figure out what it means for the evolution of interventionist thinking in my field. Continue reading

Share

The Ethics of Surrogacy

Share

surr
The Ethics of Surrogacy

by Raywat Deonandan
Feb 3, 2012

This article was originally published in India Currents Magazine.

 

There’s a photo I often show my audience before starting my lectures on “reproductive tourism.” It’s from a marketing brochure of the Akanksha infertility clinic in Anand, India, and features its medical director, Nayna Patel, standing regally amongst a group of seated women, each with her face strategically concealed. These women are commercial surrogate mothers, whose wombs are for rent to wealthy Indians and foreigners alike. Continue reading

Share